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As-salamu alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barak‚tuhu 

 

SUFISM

 

The path 

The path ( tariqah) begins with repentance. A mystical guide (shaykh, pir) accepts the seeker as disciple (murid), orders him to follow strict ascetic practices, and suggests certain formulas for meditation. It is said that the disciple should be in the hands of the master "like a corpse in the hand of the washer." The master teaches him constant struggle (the real "Holy War") against the lower soul, often represented as a black dog, which should, however, not be killed but merely tamed and used in the way of God. The mystic dwells in a number of spiritual stations (maqam), which are described in varying sequence, and, after the initial repentance, comprise abstinence, renunciation, and poverty--according to Muhammad's saying, "Poverty is my pride"; poverty was sometimes interpreted as having no interest in anything apart from God, the Rich One, but the concrete meaning of poverty prevailed, which is why the mystic is often denoted as "poor," fakir or dervish. Patience and gratitude belong to higher stations of the path, and consent is the loving acceptance of every affliction. (See tariqa, religious education.)

On his way to illumination the mystic will undergo such changing spiritual states (hal) as qab and bast, constraint and happy spiritual expansion, fear and hope, and longing and intimacy, which are granted by God and last for longer or shorter periods of time, changing in intensity according to the station in which the mystic is abiding at the moment. The way culminates in ma'rifah ("interior knowledge," "gnosis") or in mahabbah ("love"), the central subject of Sufism since the 9th century, which implies a union of lover and beloved, and was therefore violently rejected by the orthodox, for whom "love of God" meant simply obedience. The final goal is fana' ("annihilation"), primarily an ethical concept of annihilating one's own qualities, according to the prophetic saying "Take over the qualities of God," but slowly developing into a complete extinction of the personality. Some mystics taught that behind this negative unity where the self is completely effaced, the baqa', ("duration, life in God") is found: the ecstatic experience, called intoxication, is followed by the "second sobriety"; i.e., the return of the completely transformed mystic into this world where he acts as a living witness of God or continues the "journey in God." The mystic has reached haqiqah ("realty"), after finishing the tariqah ("path"), which is built upon the shari'ah ("law"). Later, the disciple is led through fana' fi ashshaykh ("annihilation in the master") to fana' fiar-Rasul ("annihilation in the Prophet") before reaching, if at all, fana' fi-Allah ("annihilation in God").

One of the means used on the path is the ritual prayer, or dhikr ("remembrance"), derived from the Qur'anic injunction "And remember God often" (surah 62:10). It consists in a repetition of either one or all of the most beautiful names of God, of the name "Allah," or of a certain religious formula, such as the profession of faith: "There is no God but Allah and Muhammad is his prophet." The rosary with 99 or 33 beads was in use as early as the 8th century for counting the thousands of repetitions. Man's whole being should eventually be transformed into remembrance of God. (See prayer.)

In the mid-9th century some mystics introduced sessions with music and poetry recitals (sama') in Baghdad in order to reach the ecstatic experience--and since then debates about the permissibility of sama', filling many books, have been written. Narcotics were used in periods of degeneration, coffee by the "sober" mystics (first by the Shadhiliyah after 1300).

Besides the wayfarers (salik) on the path, Sufis who have no master but are attracted solely by divine grace are also found; they are called Uwaysi, after Uways al-Qarani, the Yemenite contemporary of the Prophet who never saw him but firmly believed in him. There are also the so-called majdhub ("attracted") who are often persons generally agreed to be more or less mentally deranged.